Time to put a stop to the Sound-byte Generation

Touch-Screen Generation, iPad Generation, Generation Z, Touchscreen Teens These kinds of terms are a useful way for identifying if a talk will be any good or whether it will be full of sound-bytes. But the language is more than that, using it in this way disenfranchises billions of people in the world with no access…

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How the dinosaur got his nose!

I hadn’t gotten excited about 3D printing. It’s great, love the idea, understand how artists can use it, or engineers can build prototypes etc, but I hadn’t got that excited. That changed for me when I met a project in which Jisc is a partner from the British Geological Society at the Jisc Digifest in…

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Six ways to ensure sustainability for technology based interventions

Over the last two years I’ve been very lucky in working with some excellent projects in three JISC programmes; Users and Innovation, Institutional Innovation and Building Capacity. This community of projects hold a vast core of information and knowledge about the use of technology in institutions and how to get the most of it. In…

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Rethinking Dissemination in Educational Technology Projects

What is the purpose of dissemination? For most of the projects that I have been involved with dissemination is about telling people about the project. But this idea of dissemination can be traced back to when the web was a unidirectional medium; most conferences in this field have been around, at least, since the birth…

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QR Codes in education: watch this space

A QR (quick response) code is a two dimensional bar code that can be read on a mobile device, such as a camera phone. Once the device decodes the information then it will enable an action to be undertaken. For instance, this might be accessing a web page, displaying text information or subscribing to an…

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Guardian Article

There’s a great article in today’s Guardian “Tracking technology in the corridors of learning”, it reports on the use of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) antennas and tags at the University of Washington’s computer science department. Rather than the Orwellian overtones you might expect, where the ‘evil overseers’ monitor our every move, the system is open…

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